Posted on

Vic Brown – Vampire Romance (An Introduction)

Spread the love


Vic Brown

   The thriller and horror vampire movies of your childhood, while scary, were fantasy. Maybe the film that introduced you to supernatural vampires in Transylvania and Bram Stoker’s Dracula began your journey. Or maybe the Anne Rice novels: Interview with the Vampire and The Vampire Lestat. The more you searched the more convinced you became they were real.

Vampirism is the result of a mutant gene in one’s DNA. Forget all you think you know about the bite-‘em-on-the-neck syndrome. Genetics, the study of heredity, or how living things pass along their design to succeeding generations, is the key to understanding. A human becomes a vampire when it carries the mutant gene. When that gene activates, the individual begins to develop into a vampire.

A handful of scientists, working in secret at Harvard University’s genetic lab, discovered the vampire gene and how to extract it. The procedure is called the “resurrection” protocol. Their work remains highly classified for fear of repercussions. See details in the novel, Vampire Resurrection.

From the time of pre-historic man, vampires have walked among us. They established polluted blood lines. Everyone in that blood line hosts the gene for active vampirism, but only those in every third generation have that gene activated, usually by a mental or physical shock. There are exceptions. For example, if two active vampires mate, their offspring will become active vampires, usually in early adolescence.

This blog begins a series intent on answering your questions. In future blogs we’ll discuss:

  • Can vampires fall in love (as opposed to lust) with normal mortals?
  • Do vampires ever seek to become normal mortal humans?
  • During resurrection surgery has there ever been a tragic accident leading to “radical unwinding?”
  • How do you kill a vampire?
  • Must vampires consume human and/or animal blood to sustain themselves?

Check back next week if you are interested in killing vampires, pregnant vampires, or vampire genetic engineering. We’ll cover it all.


Vic Brown, author of Vampire Resurrection, and its sequel, Vampire Embrace, lives in Williamsburg, VA. His novels are published by High Tide Publications, Inc. The sequel will be released in the spring of 2018.



2 thoughts on “Vic Brown – Vampire Romance (An Introduction)

  1. I could have used you when I was teaching biology–I believe you would have gotten the students interested in genetics–but then I would have to give my fact vs fiction lecture . . .

  2. Ms. Susan:
    A month ago you kindly sent me a note about how you could have used my take on vampires being the result of a mutant gene. Mega apologies, Susan. I just now discovered your comment. (I did not scroll far enough down to find it back in Feb.)
    If I can answer any questions or support your teaching, let me know.
    I am under contract with High Tide Publications, Inc. They are located in Deltaville, VA.
    Vic Brown

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *